Coronavirus, a confrontation in Israel between police and faith, Netanyahu shuts Tel Aviv airport

Although the Israeli government is deciding to close the Tel Aviv airport to Coronavirus for a week, clashes between Haredim and the police have erupted in several parts of the country in the last few hours.The Haredim are the Orthodox Jews who, in particular, reject the imposition of avoiding gatherings to block Covid-19 by observing rather strict rules of existence. Clashes erupted today in Jerusalem, Ashdod, and again in Beni Brak, not far from Tel Aviv, following those of the last few days.

The Haredim are the Orthodox Jews who, in particular, reject the imposition of avoiding gatherings to block Covid-19 by observing rather strict rules of existence. Clashes erupted today in Jerusalem, Ashdod, and again in Beni Brak, not far from Tel Aviv, following those of the last few days.Similar scenes in Ashdod, a coastal city in the south of the country, where four officers were injured in accidents that occurred when, despite the provisions, the police attempted to disrupt the lessons of an open religious elementary school.Even in Bnei Brak, a city with a Haredim prevalence — the site of clashes in recent days — the police attempted to close a religious school connected to the Hasidic Rabbi Vizhnitz.Israel agreed to close its main airport, Ben Gurion, until 31 January in order to contain the Covid-19 outbreak. The decision was announced at the opening of a cabinet meeting by the Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, in which steps to curtail international arrivals were addressed in light of new variants of the virus, Israeli media reported.

In the world, we are ahead of every other nation. Netanyahu said in announcing the closing of the international airport between Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, no one has done what we’re doing. Defense Minister Benny Gantz declared a crackdown on violators of anti-Covid measures with higher fines in the meeting. Israel, where the first dose of the vaccine has already been given to a quarter of the population, has introduced immunisation for the 16–18 age group to allow children to take part in face-to-face tests at the end of the year. The country is currently in its third lockdown, and Netanyahu, awaiting new elections, has already helped the government, in February, to resolve the emergency.

The first data obtained by Maccabi, the Israeli health insurance fund, shows a dramatic reduction in hospital admissions over the age of 60, three weeks after getting the first dose of the Pfizer vaccine. For vaccinated individuals over 60, from day 23 onwards, from two days after the second vaccine, the Times of Israel estimates that Compared to the data obtained for the same group in the days immediately after the first vaccine, hospitalizations dropped by 60 percent. The knowledge applies to a survey of over 50,000 patients. Professor Eran Segal, a researcher at the Weizman Institute of Rehovot, writes that Coronavirus is among the critically ill hospitalised in Israel.